I found a great podcast from my ITunes store called Brain Science Podcast.  Creator, Dr. Ginger Campbell, is an Emergency Room Physician.  She has created a great resource for general interest audiences in topics related to Brain Science.  She also has a blog on Books and Ideas.

The topics covered in Brain Science Podcast vary and are very interesting.  Personally. I love to catch up by listening while on my elliptical machine in the morning.  There are over 4 years of podcasts sure to keep even the most ambitious listener busy for quite some time.

 I recently wrote to Dr. Campbell, conversation below, and sadly discovered that she is considering discontinuing the podcast after her summer break.  In other words she may or may not restart the podcast in September 2010.  Granted it is a large committment and amount of work.

I propose that anyone who enjoys learning about the brain write to Dr. Campbell by leaving a comment on the Brain Science Podcast.  Personally, I always appreciate comments to my posts and the back and forth discussion that follows.  I think hearing from interested listeners might prompt Dr. Campbell back to the mission she has been up to these past 4 years: educating folks.

I especially reach out to my clients to leave Dr. Campbell a comment after visiting her site.  Alternatively, if you are more comfortable with Facebook, leave a note at her Facebook site.

Here is the discussion I recently had with Dr. Campbell:

Tim,

Thank you so much for taking the time to write.

 

One topic that I have not yet had a chance to cover on the Brain Science Podcast is Head Trauma. This does not reflect a lack of interest on my part, but it is a result of two things. One is that since I have created the podcast for a general audience I only talk  specifically about medical issues once or twice a year. Secondly, I generally base episodes on books that are accessible to general audiences and I have yet to find a good book on Brain Trauma. This may reflect the fact that our scientific understanding is still fairly poor. Until a few decades ago patients with significant brain trauma (and spinal cord injury) usually died, so the field is relatively young.

 

After you have made it through the first year of episodes you will have a clearer idea of what I have in mind. Maybe then you might have some book suggestions.

 

Right now I am leaning toward continuing only my other podcast Books and Ideas, which would leave me the flexibility to consider brain-related topics whenever I want. But it is too early to make that decision.

 

Thank you so much for sharing my podcast with others. Even if I quit producing new shows after September, there will still be 70 episodes available, and I intend to leave these on-line as long as they remain accurate and relevant.

 

You mention that you disagree with my position on evolution and I am glad that this is not an obstacle to your enjoying the Brain Science Podcast. One current cultural trend that disturbs me is the idea people ought to agree about everything, and never listen to opposing viewpoints (let alone ideas from their opponents).

 

Since you are a lawyer, I am curious! Have you read John Stuart Mills book On LIberty?

 

Ginger

_____________________________

 

 

Dr. Campbell

 

Thank you for taking the time to respond. No I have not read the book On Liberty. I will look for it at the bookstore.

I understand your audience and desire to speak about the brain to a general audience. To a lesser extent, I occasionally post about human brain subjects that have nothing to do with TBI. Like I said, I am really fascinated with how the brain makes us who we are. I’ll explore neurophilosphy, religion and psychiatry, fiction (Crichton’s Terminal Man), Movies (The Lookout, The Soloist), Neuropsychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Neuroeducationhttp://brainandspine.titololawoffice.com/2008/06/articles/brainy-reviews/how-doctors-can-think-better/ .

 

I agree that healthy disagreement and the flow of ideas is vital. I look forward to working my way through the podcasts. There is no way I could get through reading all the books and I appreciate how you cover the content and describe the author.

 

 I posted on an interesting book entitled Another Day inThe Frontal Lobes, by Katrina Firlik. I was trying to review each chapter. Here is an example: http://brainandspine.titololawoffice.com/2007/11/articles/brainy-reviews/the-frontal-lobe-11/ If you link to my blog http://brainandspine.titololawoffice.com and click on Another Day inThe Frontal Lobes Reviews by Tim Titolo I have some other books I reviewed. I expect I will find some in your podcasts.

 

If it is OK, I intend to link to your site and podcast from my own blog. I really like the information. I had hoped we could list each other blogs on our sites. Yours is on mine. Check the right hand side of my blog (scroll down) to Links.

 

I am subscribed to your books and ideas blog/podcast although I have not visited it yet but will very soon. I love books. You are right about that blog giving you more freedom to explore brain books when they come up while still having the ability to explore multiple other areas of interest.

 

I see you are an emergency physician. Here is a problem worth considering. The care received in ERs for Brain injury or suspected brain injury is very poor. That is why, through the North American Brain Injury Society NABIS, we are advocating biomechanical professionals to be involved in ER care. Too often folks are sent home with complaints of headache or overwhelming pain from obvious injuries like fracture and lesions, and the brain injury (mild and moderate) diagnosis does not come for weeks and months. By then, the powers that be involved in damage control, defendants and insurance companies, deny causation etc. I simple CT or even more involved MRI routinely miss microscopic cellular injury, focal and diffuse.

 

I look forward to exploring the rest of the Brain Science Podcast and the Books and Ideas blog. Here is a link to books published by NABIS. http://www.braininjurybooks.com/  

Be Well and have a relaxing summer. (I love your dogs!)

 

Tim Titolo

 

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